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Upgrading FreeBSD - installing a new version 7 January 1999
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This entry documents how I upgraded my system from one version of the operating system to a newer version.  This was done from CD-ROM.
Installing the new code
The first thing I did was put the CD #1 in the machine.  Then I started /stand/sysinstall.

Under Options, I set the Release name I was about to install.

Under Upgrade, I selected All.  I chose not to install DES.   I installed the Ports collection because I have the space.

Then I selected EXIT.

I saved everything to /usr/tmp/etc.

Then I chose to install from a FreeBSD CD-ROM.

After about an hour, everything was installed.  Then I did a shutdown -r now to restart the system.

Getting it to boot
During the reboot, it froze on ep0.  This was most likely because this was a general kernel.  It's time to change the setup.

I rebooted the system but when the boot: prompt appeared, I entered -cv.   This puts the boot into verbose mode and allows you to enter configuration.

When the config> prompt appeared, I entered visual. Then I removed the conflicts, mostly by getting rid of SCSI devices (I have none) and various things.  Then I pressed Q to save and quit.

It froze at ep0.  Again.

Reboot.

At the boot: prompt, I entered kernel.old, which is my previous kernel.  This allowed me to boot the system with the old version of the operating system.  Then I compiled that kernel under the new operating system.  I suggest you following the Building and Installing a Custom Kernel section of the handbook but instead of starting with the GENERIC kernel, you can use the kernel you had before.  Apart from that, the steps are the same.

To keep this kernel around, I did the following:

cd /
cp kernel.old kernel.227

If I later wished to boot with  my old kernel, all I had to do was type kernel.227 at the boot: prompt.

IP Filter problems
After rebooting above, I had trouble with IP Filter.  You must recompile this program after upgrading the source.  I forgot to do that.  Please see When IP Filter won't load for more detail.
The verdict
Apart from the IP Filter problems, which were of my own making, the upgrade went smoothly.  My thanks to the people that worked on this release.
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